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Boilers – Climate Technology

Commercial Boilers

Let Climate Technology Mechanical Systems handle your HVAC systems so that you can focus on your business.

Manufacturers We Service

Our certified technicians are skilled in troubleshooting and repairing issues with boilers from all manufacturers. The brands listed are the most common that we deal with in the Greater Detroit Metro Area.

Boilers are designed to transfer heat, produced by combustion, to a fluid. This transfer of heat can also be achieved using electrical resistance elements or through the direct action of electrodes on the fluid. In most cases, the fluid being heated is water in the form of liquid or steam. However, if the fluid being heated is air, the heat exchange device is called a furnace, rather than a boiler.

Steam boilers are generally available in standard sizes from 60,000 to over 100,000,000 Btu/h.

Water boilers are generally available in standard sizes from 35,000 to over 100,000,000 Btu/h, many of which are in the low-pressure class.

Troubleshooting Common Problems

Loss In Pressure

Weak pressure generally indicates leakage in the system. An examination for leaks may start with checking all valves for small holes that have gone unnoticed. The exterior surface of the pressure vessel should also be inspected for damage. Other possible issues includes damaged feed pumps, an undersized heat source, or a faulty stream trap.

Uneven Heat Distribution

Certain areas within your building may have noticeable cold spots while other areas may be unnecessarily warm. Anything from floor coverings to types of walls can influence thermal performance, and the zone control systems in each location should be adjusted accordingly to correct the issue.

Automatic Shutdowns

You may run into situations where the heating component automatically switches itself off. It could be that the thermostat isn’t working properly and giving inaccurate temperature readings. Alternatively, there could be a significant loss of air pressure, a damaged pump, or blockages in the vale. If the system shuts off due to a safety concern, do not turn it on before running a full inspection.

Irregular Maintenance

Irregular or inadequate maintenance is one of the leading causes of problems with boilers. In fact, almost 80% of catastrophic failures are the result of low water condition and lack of maintenance. Neglecting minor issues can lead to more serious damage and pose a safety risk to those working in the area.

Scale Buildup or Blockages

Poor water quality severely damages a boiler. Calcium and other minerals from the water can accumulate as scale deposits within the boiler’s pressure vessel and pipes. Such deposits can interrupt the water pathway or even block it in extreme cases.

These deposits also cost money, as they increase the amount of fuel needed for the system to operate. A water treatment system for a boiler can prevent this issue. Remember, scale deposits are the biggest contributors to reduced efficiency and premature metal fatigue (costly repairs) in a commercial or industrial boiler.

Reduction in Thermal Performance

There are a wide range of issues that could inhibit the efficient performance of a commercial boiler. It could be the result of an excess of debris or dust blocking the burners.

A boiler’s burners should be checked and cleaned on a regular schedule for optimal performance and to increase the safe operation of the system. Other issues may include a faulty ignition, an inaccurate thermostat, a safety switch causing automatic shutdown.

Boiler Startup Leads to Lockouts

When a commercial boiler fails to complete its startup process, it is known as a lockout. While it is often possible to reset the system and restart the sequence to resolve this issue, if the lockout persists, it may be a sign of a larger problem with the machine.

Modern boiler control systems will often provide a fault code that building managers can use to help determine the root cause of the problem. Possible causes of a lockout may include a broken thermostat, insufficient pressure, or even a simple blown fuse.

Leakage of Water

A water leak is common and can occur anywhere in the system. Corroded pipes, fittings, threads, or other components are likely issues.

First start with an inspection of the pressure vessel and its connected piping. If there aren’t obvious signs of corrosion, using a water meter can help identify the source in a closed system, even if it’s from a concealed hole. Other possibilities includes a loss of water from condensation, a faulty pressure relief valve, or a damaged expansion tank.

A leak will eventually lead to water levels dropping low enough to shut down the system. If the system continues to leak without water levels dropping, it means that atmospheric pressure is getting in and causing premature wear. The introduction of atmospheric pressure left unchecked often causes holes in the metal from exposure to air and can allow unfiltered water to leave deposits and cause premature metal fatigue.

Troubleshooting Common Problems

Loss In Pressure

Weak pressure generally indicates leakage in the system. An examination for leaks may start with checking all valves for small holes that have gone unnoticed. The exterior surface of the pressure vessel should also be inspected for damage. Other possible issues includes damaged feed pumps, an undersized heat source, or a faulty stream trap.

Uneven Heat Distribution

Certain areas within your building may have noticeable cold spots while other areas may be unnecessarily warm. Anything from floor coverings to types of walls can influence thermal performance, and the zone control systems in each location should be adjusted accordingly to correct the issue.

Automatic Shutdowns

You may run into situations where the heating component automatically switches itself off. It could be that the thermostat isn’t working properly and giving inaccurate temperature readings. Alternatively, there could be a significant loss of air pressure, a damaged pump, or blockages in the vale. If the system shuts off due to a safety concern, do not turn it on before running a full inspection.

Irregular Maintenance

Irregular or inadequate maintenance is one of the leading causes of problems with boilers. In fact, almost 80% of catastrophic failures are the result of low water condition and lack of maintenance. Neglecting minor issues can lead to more serious damage and pose a safety risk to those working in the area.

Scale Buildup or Blockages

Poor water quality severely damages a boiler. Calcium and other minerals from the water can accumulate as scale deposits within the boiler’s pressure vessel and pipes. Such deposits can interrupt the water pathway or even block it in extreme cases.

These deposits also cost money, as they increase the amount of fuel needed for the system to operate. A water treatment system for a boiler can prevent this issue. Remember, scale deposits are the biggest contributors to reduced efficiency and premature metal fatigue (costly repairs) in a commercial or industrial boiler.

Reduction in Thermal Performance

There are a wide range of issues that could inhibit the efficient performance of a commercial boiler. It could be the result of an excess of debris or dust blocking the burners.

A boiler’s burners should be checked and cleaned on a regular schedule for optimal performance and to increase the safe operation of the system. Other issues may include a faulty ignition, an inaccurate thermostat, a safety switch causing automatic shutdown.

Boiler Startup Leads to Lockouts

When a commercial boiler fails to complete its startup process, it is known as a lockout. While it is often possible to reset the system and restart the sequence to resolve this issue, if the lockout persists, it may be a sign of a larger problem with the machine.

Modern boiler control systems will often provide a fault code that building managers can use to help determine the root cause of the problem. Possible causes of a lockout may include a broken thermostat, insufficient pressure, or even a simple blown fuse.

Leakage of Water

A water leak is common and can occur anywhere in the system. Corroded pipes, fittings, threads, or other components are likely issues.

First start with an inspection of the pressure vessel and its connected piping. If there aren’t obvious signs of corrosion, using a water meter can help identify the source in a closed system, even if it’s from a concealed hole. Other possibilities includes a loss of water from condensation, a faulty pressure relief valve, or a damaged expansion tank.

A leak will eventually lead to water levels dropping low enough to shut down the system. If the system continues to leak without water levels dropping, it means that atmospheric pressure is getting in and causing premature wear. The introduction of atmospheric pressure left unchecked often causes holes in the metal from exposure to air and can allow unfiltered water to leave deposits and cause premature metal fatigue.

Request a Quote Today!

Looking for a reliable partner for your HVAC needs? Look no further than Climate Technology Mechanical Systems.

We offer installation, repair, and replacement services for a wide range of HVAC equipment. Plus, our regular maintenance plans will help your equipment run smoothly and protect your investment. Contact us today to learn more!

Standard Practice for Inspection and Maintenance of Commercial Boilers

When we design commercial HVAC/R maintenance agreements, we’re looking to prevent equipment failures by getting ahead of problems. Simple tasks will prevent most emergencies and will help your equipment run more efficiently.

Check fuel pump for proper operation. Repair or replace as needed.
Check motor contactor for damage. Repair or replace as needed.
Check for leaks in fuel supply, heat transfer fluid, and flue gas. Repair as needed.
Check control system and devices. Clean, lubricate, repair, replace, or adjust as needed.
Repair or replace damaged refractory. Clean upper and lower drums.
Inspect blowdown valve and clear debris. Repair or replace if needed.
Verify proper operation of safety devices. Repair or replace as needed.
Check burner flame clearance from refractory at high load.
Test system water chemistry. Treat as needed.
Inspect fuel filter. Clean, repair, or replace as needed.
Check damper operation. Clean, lubricate, repair, replace, or adjust as needed.
Clean control box and tighten loose terminations.
Check combustion chamber, burner, and flue for deterioration, moisture, condensation, or combustion products. Clean, test, and adjust as needed.
Check heat exchange surfaces for buildup or fouling, corrosion, or degradation. Restore as needed.

Standard Practice for Inspection and Maintenance of Commercial Boilers

When we design commercial HVAC/R maintenance agreements, we’re looking to prevent equipment failures by getting ahead of problems. Simple tasks will prevent most emergencies and will help your equipment run more efficiently.

Check fuel pump for proper operation. Repair or replace as needed.
1
Check damper operation. Clean, lubricate, repair, replace, or adjust as needed.
2
Check for leaks in fuel supply, heat transfer fluid, and flue gas. Repair as needed.
3
Check motor contactor for damage. Repair or replace as needed.
4
Check combustion chamber, burner, and flue for deterioration, moisture, condensation, or combustion products. Clean, test, and adjust as needed.
5
Repair or replace damaged refractory. Clean upper and lower drums.
6
Test system water chemistry. Treat as needed.
7
Inspect blowdown valve and clear debris. Repair or replace if needed.
8
Check heat exchange surfaces for buildup or fouling, corrosion, or degradation. Restore as needed.
9
Check control system and devices. Clean, lubricate, repair, replace, or adjust as needed.
10
Clean control box and tighten loose terminations.
11
Inspect fuel filter. Clean, repair, or replace as needed.
12
Check burner flame clearance from refractory at high load.
13
Verify proper operation of safety devices. Repair or replace as needed.
14

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